The Discovery of Rare Allergy to Vibration

By Allergy News
In News
Feb 19th, 2016
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The National Institute of Health or NIH website recently published an article about the discovery of a genetic cause to a rare allergy to vibration. According to the article, there are activities that may  possibly cause skin rashes to humans for the said allergy. The article explains how vibration works and the possible causes for the allergic indication.

This article was published on their website:

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have identified a genetic mutation responsible for a rare form of inherited hives induced by vibration, also known as vibratory urticaria. Running, hand clapping, towel drying or even taking a bumpy bus ride can cause temporary skin rashes in people with this rare disorder.

By studying affected families, researchers discovered how vibration promotes the release of inflammatory chemicals from the immune system’s mast cells, causing hives and other allergic symptoms.

Their findings, published online in the New England Journal of Medicine on Feb. 3, suggest that people with this form of vibratory urticaria experience an exaggerated version of a normal cellular response to vibration. The study was led by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), both part of NIH.

“Investigating rare disorders such as vibratory urticaria can yield important insights into how the immune system functions and how it reacts to certain triggers to produce allergy symptoms, which can range from mild to debilitating,” said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. “The findings from this study uncover intriguing new facets of mast cell biology, adding to our knowledge of how allergic responses occur.”

“This study illustrates the power of a multidisciplinary team, involving clinicians, geneticists and basic immunologists, to get to the heart of a medical mystery,” said Dan Kastner, M.D., Ph.D., scientific director of the Intramural Research Program at NHGRI and a co-author of the study. “It also underscores the tremendous potential of new genomic techniques.”

In addition to itchy red welts at the site of vibration on the skin, people with vibratory urticaria also sometimes experience flushing, headaches, fatigue, blurry vision or a metallic taste in the mouth. Symptoms usually disappear within an hour, but those affected may experience several episodes per day.

Read full article at http://www.nih.gov

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